Phlebotomy Training Schools near Athens GA 30601

Choosing a Phlebotomist School near Athens Georgia

Athens GA phlebotomist taking blood samplePicking the ideal phlebotomy training near Athens GA is an important initial step toward a rewarding career as a phlebotomist. It might seem like a daunting undertaking to investigate and compare all of the training options that are available to you. However it’s necessary that you perform your due diligence to ensure that you get a quality education. In reality, many potential students start their search by considering 2 of the qualifiers that initially come to mind, which are cost and location. Another factor you may look into is whether to attend classes online or commute to an area campus. We’ll talk more about online schools later in this article. What you need to remember is that there is much more to checking out phlebotomy training programs than finding the closest or the cheapest one. Other factors including reputation and accreditation are also important considerations and should be part of your decision process too. To assist in that effort, we will supply a list of questions that you should ask each of the phlebotomy schools you are assessing to help you select the best one for you. But prior to doing that, let’s cover what a phlebotomist is and does, and then continue our conversation about online classes.

Phlebotomist Work Summary

Athens GA phlebotomist testing blood sampleA phlebotomist, or phlebotomy tech, collects blood samples from patients. While that is their primary duty, there is actually so much more to their job description. Prior to drawing a blood sample, a phlebotomist needs to confirm that the instruments being utilized are single use only and sterile. Following the collection, the sample has to be accurately labeled with the patient’s data. Next, paperwork needs to be properly filled out in order to track the sample from the time of collection through the lab screening process. The phlebotomist then transports the blood to either an in-house lab or to an outside lab facility where it can be screened for such things as infectious diseases, pregnancy or blood type. A number of Athens GA phlebotomists actually work in laboratories and are accountable for ensuring that samples are tested correctly under the highest quality control procedures. And if those weren’t sufficient responsibilities, they can be asked to instruct other phlebotomists in the drawing, transport and follow-up process.

Where do Phlebotomy Techs Work?

The simplest answer is wherever they treat patients. Their workplaces are numerous and varied, such as Athens GA hospitals, medical clinics, nursing homes, or blood centers. They may be assigned to collect blood samples from patients of all ages, from babies or toddlers to senior citizens. Some phlebotomists, depending on their training and their practice, specialize in drawing samples from a certain kind of patient. For example, those practicing in a nursing home or assisted living facility would only be collecting blood from elderly patients. If they are working in a maternity ward, they would be drawing blood from mothers and newborns solely. On the other hand, phlebotomy technicians working in a general hospital setting would be drawing blood from a wide range of patients and would collect samples from different patients on a daily basis.

Phlebotomy Technician Training, Certification and Licensing

Athens GA phlebotomist holding blood sampleThere are basically two types of programs that offer phlebotomist training in Athens GA, which are certificate and degree programs. The certificate program normally takes less than a year to finish and offers a general education along with the training on how to draw blood. It offers the fastest means to becoming a phlebotomy tech. An Associate of Science Degree in Clinical Laboratory Science, although not specifically a phlebotomy degree, will include training to become a phlebotomist. Offered at junior and community colleges, they normally take two years to finish. Bachelor’s Degrees are not as available and as a 4 year program furnish a more expansive background in lab sciences. When you have completed your training, you will no doubt want to become certified. While not mandated in the majority of states, a number of employers require certification before hiring technicians. A few of the principal certifying agencies include:

  • National Phlebotomy Association
  • National Healthcareer Association (NHA)
  • American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP)
  • American Medical Technologists (AMT)

There are a few states that do call for certification in order to practice as a phlebotomist, like California and Nevada. California and a few other states even require licensing. So it’s imperative that you enroll in a phlebotomist training program that not only offers a superior education, but also readies you for any licensing or certification examinations that you elect or are required to take.

Phlebotomist Online Classes

attending phlebotomy training online in Athens GATo start with, let’s resolve one likely misconception. You can’t receive all of your phlebotomist training online. A good component of the course of study will be clinical training and it will be conducted either in an approved Athens GA healthcare facility or an on-campus lab|an on-campus lab or an approved healthcare facility}. Numerous courses also require completing an internship prior to graduation. However since the non-practical component of the training may be attended online, it might be a more convenient option for many students. As an added benefit, many online schools are less expensive than their traditional counterparts. And some costs, for instance those for textbooks or commuting, may be lowered also. Just verify that the online phlebotomy program you enroll in is accredited by a national or regional accrediting agency (more on accreditation to follow). With both the extensive online and clinical training, you can receive a premium education with this means of learning. If you are dedicated enough to study at home, then attaining your certificate or degree online may be the right option for you.

What to Ask Phlebotomist Schools

Now that you have a general idea about what it takes to become a phlebotomist, it’s time to initiate your due diligence process. You might have already decided on the kind of program you want to enroll in, whether it be for a certificate or a degree. As we mentioned earlier, the location of the Georgia college is important as well as the cost of tuition. Maybe you have decided to enroll in an online phlebotomist program. All of these decisions are an important component of the procedure for choosing a school or program. But they are not the only concerns when making your decision. Following are a few questions that you should ask about all of the Athens GA colleges you are reviewing before making your final selection.

Is the Phlebotomy Program Specific to Georgia? As earlier discussed, each state has its own regulations for practicing as a phlebotomist. Some states call for certification, while a few others require licensing. Every state has its own requirement regarding the minimum amount of clinical training completed before practicing as a phlebotomist. As a result, you may need to pass a State Board, certification or licensing examination. Therefore it’s very important to select a phlebotomist program that meets the state specific requirements for Georgia or the state where you will be working and readies you for all examinations you may be required to take.

Is the Program Accredited? The phlebotomy program and school you choose should be accredited by a recognized national or regional accrediting organization, for example the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS). There are several advantages to graduating from an accredited program aside from an assurance of a superior education. First, if your program is not accredited, you will not qualify to sit for a certification exam offered by any of the earlier listed certifying agencies. Also, accreditation will help in securing financial aid or loans, which are typically not available for non-accredited programs in Athens GA. Last, earning a certificate or a degree from an accredited school can make you more desirable to future employers in the job market.

What is the College’s Reputation? In many states there is little or no regulation of phlebotomist colleges, so there are some that are not of the highest caliber. So in addition to accreditation, it’s essential to check the reputations of any schools you are looking at. You can start by requesting references from the schools from employers where they place their students as part of their job placement program. You can research internet school rating and review services and solicit the accrediting agencies for their reviews also. You can even check with several Athens GA area clinics or hospitals that you might have an interest in working for and ask if they can provide any insights. As a closing thought, you can check with the Georgia school licensing authority and find out if any complaints have been filed or if the colleges are in total compliance.

Is Adequate Training Included? To begin with, contact the Georgia regulator or the state regulator where you will be working to learn if there are any minimum requirements for the length of training, both classroom and practical. At a minimum, any Athens GA phlebotomy program that you are reviewing should furnish at least 40 hours of classroom training (most require 120) and 120 hours of clinical training. Anything lower than these minimums may indicate that the program is not comprehensive enough to provide sufficient training.

Are Internship Programs Included? Find out from the Georgia schools you are looking at if they have an internship program in partnership with local medical facilities. They are the ideal way to receive hands-on practical training typically not provided on campus. As an additional benefit, internships can assist students establish relationships within the local Athens GA health care community. And they look good on resumes also.

Is Job Placement Help Offered? Finding your first phlebotomy job will be a lot easier with the support of a job placement program. Ask if the colleges you are considering offer assistance and what their job placement rate is. If a college has a higher rate, signifying they place the majority of their students in jobs, it’s an indication that the program has both a good reputation along with a large network of professional contacts within the Athens GA medical community.

Are Class Times Offered to Fit Your Schedule? And last, it’s crucial to confirm that the final school you choose offers classes at times that will accommodate your busy lifestyle. This is particularly true if you opt to still work while going to school. If you can only go to classes at night or on weekends near Athens GA, check that they are offered at those times. Also, if you can only attend on a part-time basis, confirm it is an option as well. And if you have decided to study online, with the clinical training requirement, make certain those hours can also be completed within your schedule. And find out what the make-up protocol is should you need to miss any classes as a result of emergencies or illness.

Why Did You Desire to Be a Phlebotomy Technician?

When prepping to interview for a Phlebotomy Tech job, it's helpful to consider questions you may be asked. One of the things that recruiters frequently ask Phlebotomist candidates is "What made you pick Phlebotomy as a profession?". What the interviewer is trying to learn is not just the personal reasons you may have for becoming Phlebotomy Tech, but additionally what characteristics and skills you have that make you exceptional at your profession. You will undoubtedly be asked questions pertaining primarily to Phlebotomy, in addition to a significant number of typical interview questions, so you must prepare a number of ideas about how you would like to answer them. Because there are several factors that go into choosing a career, you can respond to this fundamental question in a multitude of ways. When preparing an answer, try to include the reasons the work interests you in addition to the talents you have that make you an exceptional Phlebotomist and the best candidate for the position. Don't attempt to memorize a response, but jot down several concepts and anecdotes that relate to your personal strengths and experiences. Reviewing sample answers can help you to prepare your own concepts, and provide ideas of what to discuss to wow the interviewer.

Select the Best Phlebotomist School near Athens GA

Making certain that you choose the most suitable phlebotomy training is an essential first step toward your success in this fulfilling medical care field. As we have discussed in this article, there are multiple factors that contribute toward the selection of a premium program. Phlebotomist training programs are available in a number of educational institutes, including community or junior colleges, vocational schools, and colleges and universities that offer a wide assortment of programs in healthcare and medical sciences. Course offerings may differ slightly across the country as every state has its own requirements when it pertains to phlebotomist training, licensing and certification. The most critical point is that you need to thoroughly screen and compare each college prior to making your ultimate selection. By addressing the questions that we have presented, you will be able to fine tune your options so that you can pick the best college for you. And with the proper education, you can reach your goal of becoming a phlebotomist in Athens GA.

Learn About Athens Georgia

Athens, Georgia

Athens (formally known as Athens-Clarke County) is a consolidated city–county in the U.S. state of Georgia, in the northeastern part of the state about an hour's drive from the global city of Atlanta. It comprises the former city of Athens proper (the county seat) and Clarke County. The University of Georgia, the state's flagship public research university, is located in this college town, and contributed to its initial growth. In 1991, after a vote the preceding year, the original city abandoned its charter to form a unified government with Clarke County, referred to jointly as Athens-Clarke County.[2] As of the 2010 census, the consolidated city-county (including all of Athens-Clarke County except Winterville and a portion of Bogart) had a total population of 115,452; all of Clarke County had a population of 116,714.[3] Athens is the sixth-largest city in Georgia, and the principal city of the Athens-Clarke County, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area,[4] which had a population of 192,541 as of the 2010 census.[5] Athens-Clarke County has the smallest geographical area of a county in Georgia.[citation needed]

In the late 18th century, a trading settlement on the banks of the Oconee River called Cedar Shoals stood where Athens is located today. On January 27, 1785, the Georgia General Assembly granted a charter by Abraham Baldwin for the University of Georgia as the first state-supported university. Sixteen years later, in 1801, a committee from the university's board of trustees selected a site for the university on a hill above Cedar Shoals, in what was then Jackson County. On July 25, John Milledge, one of the trustees and later governor of Georgia, bought 633 acres (256 ha) from Daniel Easley and donated it to the university. Milledge named the surrounding area Athens after the city that was home to the Platonic Academy of Plato and Aristotle in Greece.[6]

The first buildings on the University of Georgia campus were made from logs. The town grew as lots adjacent to the college were sold to raise money for the additional construction of the school. By the time the first class graduated from the university in 1804, Athens consisted of three homes, three stores, and a few other buildings facing Front Street, now known as Broad Street. Completed in 1806 and named in honor of Benjamin Franklin, Franklin College was the first permanent structure of the University of Georgia and of the city of Athens. This brick building is now known as Old College.

Athens officially became a town in December 1806 with a government made up of a three-member commission.[7] The university continued to grow, as did the town, with cotton mills fueling the industrial and commercial development. Athens became known as the "Manchester of the South" after the city in England known for its mills. In 1833 a group of Athens businessmen led by James Camak, tired of their wagons getting stuck in the mud, built one of Georgia's first railroads, the Georgia, connecting Athens to Augusta by 1841, and to Marthasville (now Atlanta) by 1845. In the 1830s and 1840s, transportation developments combined with the growing influence of the University of Georgia made Athens one of the state's most important cities as the antebellum era neared the height of its development. The university essentially created a chain reaction of growth in the community which developed on its doorstep.[8]

 

 

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